Calm after the storm

The last month has been hectic, particularly in politics. In the weeks running up to the RNC I was nervous about Ron Paul getting the votes he needed, and maintaining his delegates in the face of tyranny from the Romney camp. I made a last stand to defend the great doctor, and to wake as many people up as possible before the roll call at the RNC on the 28th August 2012. A day which will now live in infamy; a day when a great constitutional patriot was shunned live on television for the world to see. I was infuriated that the republican establishment would stoop so low and shun the only man in the room who could win the general election for us. But on reflection, they did us a great favor; we now know that both parties are completely corrupt and need to go. Many of Ron Paul’s supporters including myself will now be voting for Libertarian candidate Gary Johnson, who vetoed over 750 bills while governor of New Mexico. The revolution was gaining momentum before that fateful day, now it has gone into high gear.

Then came the DNC, and what a cop-out that was. I didn’t watch very much of it, but the ‘highlights’ were atrocious. We are currently living in Ayn Rand’s nightmare before the heroes leave in ‘Atlas Shrugged’.

And now that hurricane Issac has passed, and the parties are done with their conventions, it leaves me to wonder if I should shrug too. I worked very hard to promote Ron Paul during his campaign, and spent the entire week after the RNC showing how Gary Johnson is very similar to Ron Paul, and that patriots should vote for him instead of ‘the lesser of two evils.’

This country cannot survive much more money printing. We have already reached 16 trillion dollars; which is completely unsustainable. And there are far too many people who are asleep at the wheel in politics, or simply do not understand how bad things really are and why.

When I got back from my trip to see my family back in England earlier this year, I felt like I was entering a prison. I wrote about how I felt in a blog a couple days after I landed. It was shocking to me to find ‘the land of the free’ to be in such a state of tyranny.

For me I could easily shrug and live somewhere else. One of the perks of being born in Britain is that you never lose your citizenship. If I wanted to, I could return home or live overseas in Europe or a number of other islands spread throughout the world. But as Ayn Rand said “you can avoid evil, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding evil.” This is very true. Sure I could shrug, but how far would it get me? I could buy myself some time, and live like some sort of fugitive, but I wouldn’t be living a good and full life. When I came to this country I believed in the promise of freedom in America, in the American dream that you could make anything of yourself that you please. So my shock and upset at realizing that this country has fallen down the slippery slope toward totalitarianism, has only strengthened my resolve to be one of the leading voices to pull the country and its patriotic citizens out of the abyss.

This road back toward liberty will not be easy. This road has not yet been charted. We are like Knights forging through the thick forest, creating our own trails in our wake. My father in law created a post about himself, and the new generation of writers who lead the way through the mindless masses and media deception to expose the truth.

We will lead the charge back toward liberty, because if it is lost here in America, then there is little hope for the rest of the world.

For now though, I feel calm. I have made many of the points I needed to over the last month, and I’m enjoying somewhat of a vacation in my mind. It is always buzzing and sometimes there are great waves that must splash down and create; usually in the form of writing. Right now though, my mind is calm, and is clear like the weather outside. It is truly a beautiful early fall afternoon, and I feel like taking a ride on my V-Star. There is something very soothing about riding a V-Twin motorcycle through the countryside on a fall afternoon.

Julian Assange speaks out

Julian Assange is something of an enigma. To be honest, I don’t know a lot about him. I still don’t pay much attention to the mainstream news, and I don’t like conspiracy theories. So I mildly pay attention and try to figure out the real story from a distance. Today Julian spoke out from the Ecuadorian Embassy in London. I found much of what he said to be intriguing and inspiring.

LONDON (Reuters) – WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange used the balcony of the Ecuadorean embassy on Sunday to berate the United States for threatening freedom of expression and called on President Barack Obama to end what he called a witch-hunt against his whistle-blowing website.

Speaking from within the London mission to avoid arrest by British police who want to extradite him to Sweden for questioning over rape allegations, Assange said the United States was fighting a war against outlets like WikiLeaks.

Pitching himself alongside Russian punk band Pussy Riot and the New York Times newspaper, Assange said the United States risked shunting the world into an era of journalistic oppression. He did not address the rape allegations.

“As WikiLeaks stands under threat, so does the freedom of expression and the health of all of our societies,” Assange said, dressed in a maroon tie and blue shirt, flanked by the yellow, blue and red Ecuadorean flag.

“I ask President Obama to do the right thing: the United States much renounce its witch-hunt against WikiLeaks,” Assange said in a 10-minute speech which he ended with two thumbs up to the world’s media.

Ecuadorean President Rafael Correa, a self-declared enemy of “corrupt” media and U.S. “imperialism”, granted the former computer hacker political asylum last week, deepening a diplomatic standoff with Britain and Sweden.

Asylum in Ecuador marked the latest twist in a tumultuous journey for Assange since he incensed the United States and its allies by using his WikiLeaks website to leak hundreds of thousands of secret U.S. diplomatic and military cables in 2010, disclosures that often embarrassed Washington.

Assange, 41, took sanctuary in the embassy in June, jumping bail after exhausting appeals in British courts against extradition to Sweden, where he is wanted in Sweden for questioning regarding allegations of rape and sexual assault against two women.

He says he fears Sweden will eventually hand him over to the United States where, in his view, he would face persecution and long-term imprisonment. The United States says it is not involved in the matter.

‘FIGHTING SPIRIT’

To allow Assange to avoid arrest by stepping outside the embassy, a balcony door on an upper floor was removed, leading up to his first public appearance since seeking refuge in the diplomatic mission two months ago.

Speaking behind the condor of the Ecuadorean coat of arms on the white balcony railing of the embassy, Assange thanked Correa and Ecuador’s diplomats, whom he praised for standing up against oppression.

“The sun came up on a different world and a courageous Latin American nation took a stand for justice,” Assange, with cropped hair indicating a recent cut, said from the balcony.

Assange’s attempt to escape extradition has touched off a diplomatic tussle between Britain and Ecuador, which accused London of threatening to raid its embassy and casting the dispute as an arrogant European power treating a Latin American nation like a colony.

Assange, who praised a dozen Latin American countries which he said had rallied against Britain in the dispute, said the United States was at a turning point which could drag the rest of the world into a new oppressive era.

He said U.S. army intelligence analyst Bradley Manning, accused of the largest leak of classified documents in U.S. history to WikiLeaks, was a hero who should be released by the United States.

Manning faces life in prison if convicted.

“If Bradley Manning did as he is accused, he is a hero and an example to all of us and one of the world’s foremost political prisoners,” said Assange. “Bradley Manning must be released.”

‘FIGHTING SPIRIT’

More than 50 of Assange supporters, many of whom have slept on sheets of cardboard outside the building since Wednesday, decorated barriers with messages of support for Assange and placards reading “asylum – end the witch hunt”.

“They are not treating him fairly,” said Chantal, 28, a French pro-WikiLeaks blogger who had traveled overnight with a friend from near Paris in the hope of seeing Assange speak.

“Great Britain has shown it doesn’t respect human rights – political asylum is a right which should be respected by all countries,” she said. She refused to give her surname.

There was also a large crowd of curious passersby and bemused shoppers with bags from the nearby ritzy Harrods store watching the proceedings from across the street.

“Julian Assange is in fighting spirit,” Baltasar Garzon, a Spanish jurist and prominent human rights investigator who heads Assange’s legal team, told reporters outside the embassy.

“He is thankful to the people of Ecuador and to President Correa for granting him asylum,” said Garzon.

Britain says the dispute is about its legal obligations and that Assange should be extradited to Sweden. But Assange says he fears he will eventually be sent to the United States although Washington has so far kept its distance from the dispute.

(Writing by Guy Faulconbridge; Additional reporting by Alessandra Prentice in London and Morag MacKinnon in Sydney; Editing by Mark Heinrich and Giles Elgood)

The case of Bradly Manning is a difficult one. During a time when the country is under the influence of criminals throughout the political spectrum. At what point do we call him a traitor for exposing his country’s secrets? Or a patriot for doing the very same thing?

I think the most important thing Julian said during this article is “As WikiLeaks stands under threat, so does the freedom of expression and the health of all of our societies” and that ‘the United States was at a turning point which could drag the rest of the world into a new oppressive era.’

I find it terrifying that the country which fought off fascism, is now poised to take over Nazi Germany as the most oppressive country in human history. We now start wars based on ‘potential threats’. These wars are started off false information and pandering by the media. The true reasons are kept secret, and there are war profiteers who make substantial gains behind the scenes, while many innocent people die in the bloodshed. We now have the largest prison population in human history, and there are ever growing accounts of police brutality, while our freedoms are surrendered at the stroke of a pen.

I know that exposing military secrets is tantamount to treason, and I certainly wouldn’t recommend acting in this way. I know that wiki-leaks isn’t necessarily a good website because of these reasons. But the pursuance of Assange and the treatment of Manning is very telling in how close they got to the mark; on how our countries are currently functioning behind the scenes. There is much criminality to be spread around, and our governments are not acting within the scope that they were intended to.

I do not believe Assange is guilty of the sexual assault allegations, I believe these are trumped up charges to get him locked up or shut up. What he and Manning did is expose the beast for what it is. Whether what they did is right or not, that is for you to decide. Because the actions that our governments take will affect you.

Where we draw the line in cases like this is the difficult part, because it is dangerous to be right when the government is wrong.

How far would you be willing to go to expose the truth or protect people who speak out? There is a difference between blind nationalism and true patriotism.

Think about it.

“Laws control the lesser man… Right conduct controls the greater one.” – Mark Twain