Homesick

Since my birthday on the 21st November, I have become quite homesick. I had a great day; I went out to eat with my wife, and then we went and watched the new James Bond movie. While watching Skyfall I got to see areas of London which I recognized, and I started to feel the pangs of feeling homesick and missing sites that I was familiar with. England might not be the freest country in the world, but it is certainly not a dictatorship. England has given the world many modern conveniences and freedoms. The Magna Carta was used heavily in the formation of the US constitution, and British scientists continue to push the world forward in human discoveries.

I was born and raised in a small city called Canterbury; a city made famous by its ancient cathedral and by Geoffrey Chaucer’s ‘the Canterbury Tales’. It is very much a tourist city, with education at its heart; it has three universities.

Canterbury (Listeni/ˈkæntərˌbɜri/ or /ˈkæntərˌbɛri/)[1] is a historic English cathedral city, which lies at the heart of the City of Canterbury, a district of Kent in South East England. It lies on the River Stour.

Originally a Brythonic settlement called *Durou̯ernon (composed of the ancient British roots *duro- “stronghold”, *u̯erno- “alder tree”), it was renamed Durovernum Cantiacorum by the Roman conquerors in the 1st century AD. After it became the chief Jutish settlement, it gained its English name Canterbury, itself derived from the Old English Cantwareburh (“Kent people’s stronghold”). After the Kingdom of Kent’s conversion to Christianity in 597, St Augustine founded an episcopal see in the city and became the first Archbishop of Canterbury, a position that now heads the Church of England and the worldwide Anglican Communion (though the modern-day Province of Canterbury covers the entire south of England). Thomas Becket’s murder at Canterbury Cathedral in 1170 led to the cathedral becoming a place of pilgrimage for Christians worldwide. This pilgrimage provided the theme for Geoffrey Chaucer’s 14th-century literary classic The Canterbury Tales. The literary heritage continued with the birth of the playwright Christopher Marlowe in the city in the 16th century.

Parts of the city have been designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Many historical structures remain, including a city wall founded in Roman times and rebuilt in the 14th century, the ruins of St Augustine’s Abbey and a Norman castle, and perhaps the oldest school in England, The King’s School. Modern additions include the University of Kent, Canterbury Christ Church University, the University College for the Creative Arts, the Marlowe Theatre, and the St Lawrence Ground, home to Kent County Cricket Club. The city lies at the heart of the City of Canterbury, a local government district.

Canterbury is a popular tourist destination: consistently one of the most-visited cities in the United Kingdom,[2] the city’s economy is heavily reliant upon tourism. There is also a substantial student population, brought about by the presence of three universities. Canterbury is, however, a relatively small city, when compared with other British cities.

I was born in Canterbury, and went to schools in the city growing up. I attended St Stevens Infant and Junior schools (protestant Christian schools) as a young boy, and attended Canterbury High school through my teenage years. My parent’s philosophy is to live and let live, and to be considerate of others. I was quite shy growing up, but I loved my home town and was very proud of my British heritage. My family goes back hundreds of years, and I am from English heritage as far back as records go. I recently found out through my uncle on my last visit that one of my great great great grand mother’s was Irish, and that her husband brought her back to England. As far as I am aware, my family has always lived in the south east of England.

My home country is very much steeped in tradition, and the ideals of being ‘proper’ are very prominent. English people for the most part live very structured lives, and when I met my wife, I very rebelliously found out that things didn’t have to be that way. In America you can be anything that you want to be. But now as I mature into adult life, I realize that structure is important. I see so many Americans working all hours of the day chasing their tails and not fully experiencing life itself. Sure they might have a big house and a fancy car, but they never have time to fully enjoy it. I look at the Universities and realize I could never go to them through the shear costs. Now that I am fast approaching my later twenties, and the talk of children continues to come up between my wife and I (both our younger sisters now have children) I wonder what kind of life they will be able to have in this country. The land of opportunity seems to be consuming itself, and has become more divided than ever. England has been through its share of ups and downs, and appears to be resilient to the tides of change. America I fear, will not be able to cope with the changes that it now faces.

I want to live in a free world, where anyone can be what they want to be. I do not want some over authoritarian government watching my every move and telling me what I can and cannot do.

I lived within Canterbury’s city limits until age 9 when my parents moved us to a small village called ‘Sturry’ which was right on the outskirts of the city. It was a short 4 mile hike to the center of Canterbury, but we had a house that overlooked a field, and it felt very rural. Sturry is where my mum’s family have lived for over a hundred years, and the village itself is steeped in history.

Human habitation in Sturry is thought to have started around 430,000 years ago, as dated flint implements – namely knives and arrow-tips – show. Other signs of early human activities include a collection of axes and pottery shards from the Bronze Age and more pottery from the Sturry Hill gravel-pits, and a burial-ground near Stonerocks Farm showed that there was an Iron Age settlement of Belgic Celts (who gave Canterbury its pre-Roman name of Durovemum) from the end of the 2nd Century BC. All this evidence indicates that human habitation of some kind existed on the north bank of the River Stour, on Sturry’s site, for hundreds and thousands of years. When the Romans arrived, they built Island Road (the A28) to connect Canterbury, the local tribal capital, with the ferry to the Isle of Thanet, with a branch to their fort at Reculver.

The most important era for Sturry, determining its future shape, size, function and name, was that part of the early 5th century when the beleaguered Romano-Britons brought in Frisians and Jutes as mercenaries to help them fight against invading Picts and Scots, and rewarded them with land. Some of them settled near Sturry: their cemetery was found at Hersden. Then in the mid 5 Century, Kent was re-organised into lathes, or districts. Sturry was the first; Stour-gau, meaning district or lathe on the Stour. The lathe was bounded by the Stour as far as Canterbury in the North by the sea, and farther south as distant as Wye.

The remains of a large village water mill lie near the parish church, and the High Street retains some charming historic buildings. The village virtually adjoins one of the smallest towns in England, Fordwich, where there are further interesting buildings, including the historic Town Hall. Fordwich itself is smaller in size than Sturry. A rare survival, a small granary, constructed with wooden weather-boards is located at Blaxland Farm and has nine staddle stones supporting it. A barn from Vale Farm, Calcott has been re-erected at the Museum of Kent Life, Sandling. A 16th Century manor house and oasthouse, built in 1583 and which belonged to St Augustine’s Abbey in Canterbury still stand in Sturry village beside the medieval tithe barn – although they have all been incorporated into the King School after they were sold by the widow of Lord Milner in 1925.

Since the 1960s a large number of satellite housing estates have been built on the north side of the village, mostly in former woodland, which have turned Sturry into one of the major dormitary villages for Canterbury. Nonetheless, the village is still overwhelmingly rural, with fields for arable farming and livestock grazing, and large amounts of coppice woodland. A number of market gardens can also be found in the countryside around the village. Large and deep quarries are still worked on the edge of the village, with the old workings flooded to provide recreational lakes used primarily for fishing.

During the Second World War, Sturry was one of the most badly bombed villages in England, the greater part of the High Street being destroyed by a parachute mine in 1941 during the Baedeker Blitz, killing 15 people of which 7 were children aged 12 and under.[1] One of these was a little girl who had been to the bakers’ and whose body was recovered still clutching the bag of buns she had bought.[2] The same aircraft dropped another bomb, but this landed amongst the allotments. In the book, Letters to Sturry, it is recorded that on Wednesday, 28 August 1940, there were eight separate air raid warnings and on ‘Battle of Britain Day’, 15 September 1940, a German Dornier bomber plane, (Aircraft 2651, 3rd Staffel, Kampfgeschwader 76), crash-landed in a field below Kemberland Wood near the Sarre Penne stream. Three of the five crew were killed and were firstly buried in Sturry Cemetery but then re-interred in the late 1960s into the German war cemetery at Cannock Chase.

Nonetheless a number of interesting buildings remain intact in Sturry, including St Nicholas parish church, which is predominantly Norman in style, with the oldest parts dating to about 1200. The Manor House, built in 1583, is now the junior school of The King’s School, Canterbury.

My grandmother survived the bombing of Sturry and her oldest brother has many stories to tell of German planes flying over head during the war. While England may be more progressive and socialist than in previous decades, it is still very much a capitalist society, and thrives off innovation and technologies. It should be no surprise then that I get very unnerved when I hear people supporting wars in the middle east, and check points at highways in the US. I find this to be fascism 101 and it is something which makes older generations shudder, especially my grandparents. My grandfather still remembers a V2 rocket flying alongside his fathers car while they were driving home one day, and pulling off onto the side of the road, waiting for the bomb to drop in the distance and explode.

I am feeling very homesick right now because I know that Britain will shake off the stupidity of socialism in good time, and will continue to educate its populace in the traditions of old, while teaching the importance of the sciences, math and good English. I fear that America in reaction to socialism from the left, will careen hard to the right and pick up the same failed philosophies of Adolf Hitler during the 1930’s in response to communism.

I don’t particularly consider myself a patriot of either nation, at least not in the traditional statist sense. I don’t blindly support the flag of either nation, but I am very proud of each nation’s history. I love my British heritage, and I love the constitution and values of my adopted nation.

I simply want to live in a free world, and self determine what is best for me. I want to make my own living, and not have others tell me what I can and cannot do. So long as we don’t go out of our way to hurt others, why should we be stopped from acting off our own accord?

I am beginning to care less and less about politics, it is simply a means to an end. The US is rife with corrupt politicians, and the only way to fix that is to learn about it, flush out the bad ones by replacing them, and find all the goodness that you can within yourself. Actions speak louder than words. It is not so much what you believe in that counts, it is the way that you treat others.

It is far more important to live well, educate yourself, and provide a good example than to simply point out others and call them stupid. We teach our kids by setting a good example, so why shouldn’t we live and talk to others in such a manner?

A home is created on values, and by gritting our teeth through the hard times. We must never forget our history, and we must always learn from the mistakes of the past. The world will be a much better place if we can learn to be happy and advance ourselves and enjoy life to the best degree possible, even if the rest of the world is falling apart. The world is built and rebuilt by those who look toward the future. It is up to each of us as individuals to make it a good one.

Calm after the storm

The last month has been hectic, particularly in politics. In the weeks running up to the RNC I was nervous about Ron Paul getting the votes he needed, and maintaining his delegates in the face of tyranny from the Romney camp. I made a last stand to defend the great doctor, and to wake as many people up as possible before the roll call at the RNC on the 28th August 2012. A day which will now live in infamy; a day when a great constitutional patriot was shunned live on television for the world to see. I was infuriated that the republican establishment would stoop so low and shun the only man in the room who could win the general election for us. But on reflection, they did us a great favor; we now know that both parties are completely corrupt and need to go. Many of Ron Paul’s supporters including myself will now be voting for Libertarian candidate Gary Johnson, who vetoed over 750 bills while governor of New Mexico. The revolution was gaining momentum before that fateful day, now it has gone into high gear.

Then came the DNC, and what a cop-out that was. I didn’t watch very much of it, but the ‘highlights’ were atrocious. We are currently living in Ayn Rand’s nightmare before the heroes leave in ‘Atlas Shrugged’.

And now that hurricane Issac has passed, and the parties are done with their conventions, it leaves me to wonder if I should shrug too. I worked very hard to promote Ron Paul during his campaign, and spent the entire week after the RNC showing how Gary Johnson is very similar to Ron Paul, and that patriots should vote for him instead of ‘the lesser of two evils.’

This country cannot survive much more money printing. We have already reached 16 trillion dollars; which is completely unsustainable. And there are far too many people who are asleep at the wheel in politics, or simply do not understand how bad things really are and why.

When I got back from my trip to see my family back in England earlier this year, I felt like I was entering a prison. I wrote about how I felt in a blog a couple days after I landed. It was shocking to me to find ‘the land of the free’ to be in such a state of tyranny.

For me I could easily shrug and live somewhere else. One of the perks of being born in Britain is that you never lose your citizenship. If I wanted to, I could return home or live overseas in Europe or a number of other islands spread throughout the world. But as Ayn Rand said “you can avoid evil, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding evil.” This is very true. Sure I could shrug, but how far would it get me? I could buy myself some time, and live like some sort of fugitive, but I wouldn’t be living a good and full life. When I came to this country I believed in the promise of freedom in America, in the American dream that you could make anything of yourself that you please. So my shock and upset at realizing that this country has fallen down the slippery slope toward totalitarianism, has only strengthened my resolve to be one of the leading voices to pull the country and its patriotic citizens out of the abyss.

This road back toward liberty will not be easy. This road has not yet been charted. We are like Knights forging through the thick forest, creating our own trails in our wake. My father in law created a post about himself, and the new generation of writers who lead the way through the mindless masses and media deception to expose the truth.

We will lead the charge back toward liberty, because if it is lost here in America, then there is little hope for the rest of the world.

For now though, I feel calm. I have made many of the points I needed to over the last month, and I’m enjoying somewhat of a vacation in my mind. It is always buzzing and sometimes there are great waves that must splash down and create; usually in the form of writing. Right now though, my mind is calm, and is clear like the weather outside. It is truly a beautiful early fall afternoon, and I feel like taking a ride on my V-Star. There is something very soothing about riding a V-Twin motorcycle through the countryside on a fall afternoon.

Americans have forgotten freedom

My wife and I started out with nothing but each other. Not only did we come from different countries, but we were not given everything we wanted as teenagers. Neither my parents nor hers gave us tuition for university. Both of us are very intelligent, and we have put our minds to good use. We both work full time and run a company together.

Earlier today my wife was working at her store where she is an assistant manager. She and one of the associates got in a conversation and the guy said that “the government should just give everyone a million dollars.” To which my wife replied “where do you think the government gets that money?” The guy did not know, and my wife told him that the money is taken from you and I, from all of us, and redistributed after the government employees have taken their considerable cut. So really our wealth is diminished every time we are taxed more and more money is spent. I could expand her point further by saying that the more money is printed out of thin air and handed out to everyone, the more value it loses, and no mater how much more money you pump into the system, all you’ll do is saturate the market and there will be no value and no use for the money, just like in the Weimar Republic in post WWI Germany.

Back to my wife and I. Now we could have gone to college with or without financial support from both sets of parents. In fact, we actually looked at attending an American college shortly after we got married. The biggest reason we decided not to attend was financial. Neither of us can justify going 100’s of thousands of dollars into debt for a ‘quality’ American education. Recently I met up with one of my old friends in London when we went to visit. He graduated from Cambridge and told us that he only paid 3000 pounds a year ($5000) for his tuition. Now I’m sorry, but only Yale and Harvard can compare to the likes of Cambridge or Oxford. Most American colleges now run in the $10’s of thousands a year now, and the quality certainly isn’t there. American colleges have been saturated by government backed student loans, and you can now get a bachelors degree in almost everything including hairdressing. I’m sorry, but unless it holds a true quality of the mind in what you have studied, it’s not worth the paper its printed on. There are plenty of good community colleges for craftsmanship, and I have always favored apprenticeships over ‘shop-class’.

America has not only lost its sense of value, but many of its citizens do not even know what it means to be free. They do not know how to simply say ‘no’.

The American empire has expanded so far that people now allow themselves to be patted down at airports, stopped at ‘sobriety’ checkpoints (Nazi-lite anyone?) and stripped of almost all their constitutional rights on a daily bases. They openly believe almost everything they hear on TV, including the heavily biased propaganda machine that is American News channels. Americans are so afraid of losing their jobs, so inclined to ‘work hard’ and pay off their debts. Debts which are incurred under the corrupt banking and government cartel known as the Federal Reserve, money which is stolen from the people through taxation and then lent back out to the people in paper money at interest.

The problems with America run so deep, that the nation is deeply divided. It is not simply a case of left vs right either. Many conservatives, though perhaps more open minded to the idea of the constitution and limited government, still believe in many big government programs. Programs such as the overly expanded and stretched out military, restoring the draft (involuntary servitude anyone?) in the name of honor and sacrifice. They believe that a progressive such as Mitt Romney will save the day against the dreaded Obama, and yet forget that they both stand for the same unlimited government.

There are many wars going on right now in the Middle East, and this country is stretched thin in many areas, from the economy, to the military. Right now our battlefield is a philosophical one.

Where does the government get its money from? All of it is stolen from you. Government is supposed to be our servant. It is supposed to serve us in basic areas only to maintain limited law and order.

Ask yourself these questions:

Where does the government get its money from?

Is my purpose in life to make the most out of it for myself and my family, or be a slave to a collective?

Am I supposed to serve the government, or myself?

Am I not by serving myself, and protecting myself, really protecting others too?

Or

Am I supposed to listen to what others tell me to do, and please the collective driven by leaders in the shadows?

Watch the movie ‘The Matrix’ and realize how it reflects on our current society. I took the ‘red pill’ a long time ago, and the rabbit hole is a long way down. Question is, are you ready to take it too? Or just take the blue pill, turn the news channel on tv back on and fall asleep?

Americans have forgotten freedom, because as I watched the fireworks going off on July 4th this year, I couldn’t understand what they were celebrating any more. Will all the intrusions of government in our everyday affairs, what freedom is really left? What I see around me right now mirrors that of the British oppression of the 1700’s, or that of Nazi Germany of the 1930’s.

Are you ready to wake up and declare true independence? Or have you forgotten too?

Becoming American

Yesterday I became an American Citizen. I swore an oath of allegiance and swore to protect the constitution, and defend the republic of the United States of America.

I met my wife almost eight years ago, and four years ago we decided to marry. After three years of permanent residency within this country, I decided to become an American citizen. I chose to do this because this is the country that my wife and I will always live in, and I chose to make it my country because its values are in line with my own.

This is how the day went:

I woke up around 8:30, let our dog out, had some breakfast, then took a shower. I shaved, gelled my hair, and generally made myself look presentable, before putting on the same suit I wore on our wedding day almost 4 years ago. After dressing, tying my shoes, and looking at myself in the mirror, I grabbed my wallet, keys and phone, and headed out toward my in-laws mini-van with my wife, as they picked us up and drove us down to Cincinnati. It was quite cold outside, the coldest day of the year so far, and there were slight swirls of snow fluttering in the wind. We listened to the radio as Brooke punched in the address for my ceremony on her phone. When we arrived at the address, we were surprised to find out that it was a school, and found out when we walked inside that the court uses a different place each month for oath of allegiance ceremony’s, so that people from schools, universities and other places, can get a change to see new citizens being sworn in. I said hello to Brooke’s family, and took a seat up front with the rest of the immigrants who were to become citizens, and Brooke and her family took seats in the back. The immigration officials took our green-cards and remaining paperwork, and sat us in a particular order for our certificates to be handed out. The school choir then came out and sang some patriotic songs. The judge arrived and we stood up, the boy scouts then presented the colors, and we sat down again. The judge welcomed us and explained some of our new rights and responsibilities. A microphone was then handed around to each immigrant, and we said our name and where we were from. There were 123 immigrants from 49 different countries, and 4 Brits including myself. After we had stated our names and where we were from, we said the pledge of allegiance, and we were then asked to raise our right hands.

We then, as a group, pledged our allegiance to the United states, this is what we confirmed:

The Oath of Allegiance

I hereby declare, on oath, that I absolutely and entirely

renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign

prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty of whom or which I

have heretofore been a subject or citizen; that I will support

and defend the Constitution and laws of the United States of

America against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will

bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I will bear arms

on behalf of the United States when required by the law; that

I will perform noncombatant service in the Armed Forces of

the United States when required by the law; that I will perform

work of national importance under civilian direction when

required by the law; and that I take this obligation freely

without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion;

so help me God.

After the pledge, the court was adjourned, and we walked up line by line from our seating arrangement to receive our certificates of citizenship.

I went over and thanked Brooke’s family for being there with me, and we took a group photograph together, and also a picture of Brooke and I together.

After pictures were taken, and I shook everyone’s hand, we all headed over to the Hofbrauhaus to celebrate. The Hofbrauhaus is a German beer-hall, and the first to be built within the US. Although its not strictly as American as a hamburger restaurant, Cincinnati does have a rich German heritage, and it seemed appropriate to go there with such a large crowd, as they have great food, drink, and big long wooden tables. While we were there, I received gifts from Brooke’s grandparents and aunties and uncles. All of the presents were very patriotic, and had american flag themes to them. I felt honored to have them all there with me, and very humbled to feel like I was so much a part of the family. I stood up and gave a quick speech to thank them all. I really have felt like one of the family for years now, and to finally become a United States citizen, cements my future with my wife, and with her family.

Thank you to all of you who made it to my event, and to all those who couldn’t, thank you for sending your good wishes.

Now, many people may wonder why I would decide to become a citizen of a country that seems to have reached its peak, and looks to be on the decline. And to those people I say:

This country is the most free country in the world. There is no other country on this planet that protects its citizens from an overbearing government, and no other country which was founded upon the belief of freedom and self determination.

Unfortunately this country has become very corrupt, and bureaucracy has taken over. It is up to each individual within the US to protect him or herself from an overbearing government. The documents I listed in yesterdays post ‘documents to live by’ state that all men are created equal, and that it is the duty of the people to overthrow the government when it becomes too powerful.

In a civilized world, we do not wish to have bloodshed by a bloody revolution. Currently there are many grassroots campaigns going on to help the US elect better politicians to combat the corruption, such as one of the local tea party groups close to where I live:

As an American Citizen I will do my best to help elect local officials who will stay true to their words, and help cut corruption, so that productivity can resume and continue in my local community, and eventually the leaders of the local communities can become a part of the federal government and help combat corruption on a more national level.

I can see where Americans have lost their way. There are many distractions in the world, and it is all too easy to get wrapped up in what the mainstream media spews out on our television sets. It seems that the very technology that enhances our lives, has also eroded it from within.

I decided to start this blog a week ago, with the knowledge of my becoming a citizen, as my duty toward the country I call my home. Just as the American patriots of the past decided to part away from England and establish a free country of their own. I have decided to revolt away from modern England also, with all its socialist agendas holding its people back. America, for all its faults, is still a capitalist country, and despite the mountains of legalities and restrictions, is still a country driven by free enterprise. If there was any country left in the world, which could recover from a financial meltdown, it would be the United States.

My goal is to expose the truth that I see in the world, and to help teach people the true meaning of freedom and self determination. That if enough people stand up against totalitarianism and special interests, that if enough people sit down and read articles that expose the truth swept under the rug, that they can, with well informed minds, decide the future of their country.

One last thing about my citizenship ceremony yesterday. The judge showed us a copy of two documents of her grandparents. Both of whom were Italian immigrants. They had come to the US in the early 20th century, and she said that she would not be where she is today without them coming over here. She said that aside from native Americans, all 300 million Americans are either immigrants or descendent of immigrants, and that it is up to each and everyone of us to preserve and defend the united states, and to maintain the freedoms that we all enjoy.

Here’s to the judge and the speech she gave, here is to my wife and her family for supporting me, and here is too all the groups and organizations who are actively working to maintain, preserve and enrich the freedoms of this great nation:

God bless the United States of America!