Rediscovering ourselves

Watching movies like ‘Interstellar’, ‘the right stuff’ and ‘space cowboys’ have only highlighted the failings of government to me. NASA was born of bureaucracy, and it has died of bureaucracy. In fifty years, they never perfected space travel. They piggy backed off the designs of Nazi Germany’s scientists and never got away from rocket launching from the ground in order to get men into space. To this day, only several hundred people have ever traveled to the stars.

In just ten years, Virgin Galactic has revolutionized space travel. Burt Rutan’s revolutionary new designs have made space tourism a viable option in the not too distant future. Now, there have been casualties in pushing this envelope, as there always is. Many of progressive mindset have bashed Virgin Galactic in the last couple of weeks for the death of one of their test pilots, while saying that this sort of thing should be left to government experts. Are they referring to the same government experts who spent billions blowing up rockets trying to get them into space, and the many planes that went down trying to break the sound barrier? Lets not forget, that dozens of test pilots died trying to break the sound barrier, and that even with the space shuttle program, which was far from perfect, shuttles still exploded on the way up, and disintegrated on the way down, killing many of the few astronauts to go into space.

Burt Rutan, with a private enterprise backing, has done far more for space travel in the last decade, than any government agency has in the last half a century. This is a good thing, because America in particular as a nation is just now beginning to rediscover itself. The progressive mantra is slowly being pried away. We can see from the November 2014 elections that the heart of America fully and utterly rejects the democrats big government policies, headed by imperial president Barack Obama.

2014 map

While the nation has now almost completely gone red, the real battles are just now coming. Dinosaurs such as Mitch McConnell, and John Boehner have no right to be at the helm of the senate and house, their paid and patented antiquated back room deal ideology belongs on the scrap heap of history. America is beginning to rediscover Capitalism, and its place in our lives. It is Capitalism, the free market system, which spurs growth, which creates opportunities, which pushes us further than we’ve been before. It is capitalism which will take us to the stars, not soviet style big government

Americans, which the help of movies from Christopher Nolan, with constitutionalist tea party groups, and with alternative media, are rediscovering capitalism, and the fruits it bears. The republicans have swept the house and senate in such a way that has not been seen in nearly one hundred years. We now stand upon the precipice of an abyss or a great awakening. The abyss is in believing that the republicans will do what needs to be done on their own to scale back government. The great awakening is in keeping the pressure on them to roll back the reaches of government, and to allow free enterprise to once again blow the fires of industry throughout the land. We are standing on the edge of an abyss or a new renaissance. I know which one I choose. How about you?

We determine the culture each and every day, we decide which direction the country turns. We decide weather to squabble about our place in the dirt, or to reach for the stars. Each and every one of us is responsible for our own futures. In rediscovering ourselves, we reignite ourselves, we blaze a path for others to follow. The future is out there, lets go and create it!

Homesick

Since my birthday on the 21st November, I have become quite homesick. I had a great day; I went out to eat with my wife, and then we went and watched the new James Bond movie. While watching Skyfall I got to see areas of London which I recognized, and I started to feel the pangs of feeling homesick and missing sites that I was familiar with. England might not be the freest country in the world, but it is certainly not a dictatorship. England has given the world many modern conveniences and freedoms. The Magna Carta was used heavily in the formation of the US constitution, and British scientists continue to push the world forward in human discoveries.

I was born and raised in a small city called Canterbury; a city made famous by its ancient cathedral and by Geoffrey Chaucer’s ‘the Canterbury Tales’. It is very much a tourist city, with education at its heart; it has three universities.

Canterbury (Listeni/ˈkæntərˌbɜri/ or /ˈkæntərˌbɛri/)[1] is a historic English cathedral city, which lies at the heart of the City of Canterbury, a district of Kent in South East England. It lies on the River Stour.

Originally a Brythonic settlement called *Durou̯ernon (composed of the ancient British roots *duro- “stronghold”, *u̯erno- “alder tree”), it was renamed Durovernum Cantiacorum by the Roman conquerors in the 1st century AD. After it became the chief Jutish settlement, it gained its English name Canterbury, itself derived from the Old English Cantwareburh (“Kent people’s stronghold”). After the Kingdom of Kent’s conversion to Christianity in 597, St Augustine founded an episcopal see in the city and became the first Archbishop of Canterbury, a position that now heads the Church of England and the worldwide Anglican Communion (though the modern-day Province of Canterbury covers the entire south of England). Thomas Becket’s murder at Canterbury Cathedral in 1170 led to the cathedral becoming a place of pilgrimage for Christians worldwide. This pilgrimage provided the theme for Geoffrey Chaucer’s 14th-century literary classic The Canterbury Tales. The literary heritage continued with the birth of the playwright Christopher Marlowe in the city in the 16th century.

Parts of the city have been designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Many historical structures remain, including a city wall founded in Roman times and rebuilt in the 14th century, the ruins of St Augustine’s Abbey and a Norman castle, and perhaps the oldest school in England, The King’s School. Modern additions include the University of Kent, Canterbury Christ Church University, the University College for the Creative Arts, the Marlowe Theatre, and the St Lawrence Ground, home to Kent County Cricket Club. The city lies at the heart of the City of Canterbury, a local government district.

Canterbury is a popular tourist destination: consistently one of the most-visited cities in the United Kingdom,[2] the city’s economy is heavily reliant upon tourism. There is also a substantial student population, brought about by the presence of three universities. Canterbury is, however, a relatively small city, when compared with other British cities.

I was born in Canterbury, and went to schools in the city growing up. I attended St Stevens Infant and Junior schools (protestant Christian schools) as a young boy, and attended Canterbury High school through my teenage years. My parent’s philosophy is to live and let live, and to be considerate of others. I was quite shy growing up, but I loved my home town and was very proud of my British heritage. My family goes back hundreds of years, and I am from English heritage as far back as records go. I recently found out through my uncle on my last visit that one of my great great great grand mother’s was Irish, and that her husband brought her back to England. As far as I am aware, my family has always lived in the south east of England.

My home country is very much steeped in tradition, and the ideals of being ‘proper’ are very prominent. English people for the most part live very structured lives, and when I met my wife, I very rebelliously found out that things didn’t have to be that way. In America you can be anything that you want to be. But now as I mature into adult life, I realize that structure is important. I see so many Americans working all hours of the day chasing their tails and not fully experiencing life itself. Sure they might have a big house and a fancy car, but they never have time to fully enjoy it. I look at the Universities and realize I could never go to them through the shear costs. Now that I am fast approaching my later twenties, and the talk of children continues to come up between my wife and I (both our younger sisters now have children) I wonder what kind of life they will be able to have in this country. The land of opportunity seems to be consuming itself, and has become more divided than ever. England has been through its share of ups and downs, and appears to be resilient to the tides of change. America I fear, will not be able to cope with the changes that it now faces.

I want to live in a free world, where anyone can be what they want to be. I do not want some over authoritarian government watching my every move and telling me what I can and cannot do.

I lived within Canterbury’s city limits until age 9 when my parents moved us to a small village called ‘Sturry’ which was right on the outskirts of the city. It was a short 4 mile hike to the center of Canterbury, but we had a house that overlooked a field, and it felt very rural. Sturry is where my mum’s family have lived for over a hundred years, and the village itself is steeped in history.

Human habitation in Sturry is thought to have started around 430,000 years ago, as dated flint implements – namely knives and arrow-tips – show. Other signs of early human activities include a collection of axes and pottery shards from the Bronze Age and more pottery from the Sturry Hill gravel-pits, and a burial-ground near Stonerocks Farm showed that there was an Iron Age settlement of Belgic Celts (who gave Canterbury its pre-Roman name of Durovemum) from the end of the 2nd Century BC. All this evidence indicates that human habitation of some kind existed on the north bank of the River Stour, on Sturry’s site, for hundreds and thousands of years. When the Romans arrived, they built Island Road (the A28) to connect Canterbury, the local tribal capital, with the ferry to the Isle of Thanet, with a branch to their fort at Reculver.

The most important era for Sturry, determining its future shape, size, function and name, was that part of the early 5th century when the beleaguered Romano-Britons brought in Frisians and Jutes as mercenaries to help them fight against invading Picts and Scots, and rewarded them with land. Some of them settled near Sturry: their cemetery was found at Hersden. Then in the mid 5 Century, Kent was re-organised into lathes, or districts. Sturry was the first; Stour-gau, meaning district or lathe on the Stour. The lathe was bounded by the Stour as far as Canterbury in the North by the sea, and farther south as distant as Wye.

The remains of a large village water mill lie near the parish church, and the High Street retains some charming historic buildings. The village virtually adjoins one of the smallest towns in England, Fordwich, where there are further interesting buildings, including the historic Town Hall. Fordwich itself is smaller in size than Sturry. A rare survival, a small granary, constructed with wooden weather-boards is located at Blaxland Farm and has nine staddle stones supporting it. A barn from Vale Farm, Calcott has been re-erected at the Museum of Kent Life, Sandling. A 16th Century manor house and oasthouse, built in 1583 and which belonged to St Augustine’s Abbey in Canterbury still stand in Sturry village beside the medieval tithe barn – although they have all been incorporated into the King School after they were sold by the widow of Lord Milner in 1925.

Since the 1960s a large number of satellite housing estates have been built on the north side of the village, mostly in former woodland, which have turned Sturry into one of the major dormitary villages for Canterbury. Nonetheless, the village is still overwhelmingly rural, with fields for arable farming and livestock grazing, and large amounts of coppice woodland. A number of market gardens can also be found in the countryside around the village. Large and deep quarries are still worked on the edge of the village, with the old workings flooded to provide recreational lakes used primarily for fishing.

During the Second World War, Sturry was one of the most badly bombed villages in England, the greater part of the High Street being destroyed by a parachute mine in 1941 during the Baedeker Blitz, killing 15 people of which 7 were children aged 12 and under.[1] One of these was a little girl who had been to the bakers’ and whose body was recovered still clutching the bag of buns she had bought.[2] The same aircraft dropped another bomb, but this landed amongst the allotments. In the book, Letters to Sturry, it is recorded that on Wednesday, 28 August 1940, there were eight separate air raid warnings and on ‘Battle of Britain Day’, 15 September 1940, a German Dornier bomber plane, (Aircraft 2651, 3rd Staffel, Kampfgeschwader 76), crash-landed in a field below Kemberland Wood near the Sarre Penne stream. Three of the five crew were killed and were firstly buried in Sturry Cemetery but then re-interred in the late 1960s into the German war cemetery at Cannock Chase.

Nonetheless a number of interesting buildings remain intact in Sturry, including St Nicholas parish church, which is predominantly Norman in style, with the oldest parts dating to about 1200. The Manor House, built in 1583, is now the junior school of The King’s School, Canterbury.

My grandmother survived the bombing of Sturry and her oldest brother has many stories to tell of German planes flying over head during the war. While England may be more progressive and socialist than in previous decades, it is still very much a capitalist society, and thrives off innovation and technologies. It should be no surprise then that I get very unnerved when I hear people supporting wars in the middle east, and check points at highways in the US. I find this to be fascism 101 and it is something which makes older generations shudder, especially my grandparents. My grandfather still remembers a V2 rocket flying alongside his fathers car while they were driving home one day, and pulling off onto the side of the road, waiting for the bomb to drop in the distance and explode.

I am feeling very homesick right now because I know that Britain will shake off the stupidity of socialism in good time, and will continue to educate its populace in the traditions of old, while teaching the importance of the sciences, math and good English. I fear that America in reaction to socialism from the left, will careen hard to the right and pick up the same failed philosophies of Adolf Hitler during the 1930’s in response to communism.

I don’t particularly consider myself a patriot of either nation, at least not in the traditional statist sense. I don’t blindly support the flag of either nation, but I am very proud of each nation’s history. I love my British heritage, and I love the constitution and values of my adopted nation.

I simply want to live in a free world, and self determine what is best for me. I want to make my own living, and not have others tell me what I can and cannot do. So long as we don’t go out of our way to hurt others, why should we be stopped from acting off our own accord?

I am beginning to care less and less about politics, it is simply a means to an end. The US is rife with corrupt politicians, and the only way to fix that is to learn about it, flush out the bad ones by replacing them, and find all the goodness that you can within yourself. Actions speak louder than words. It is not so much what you believe in that counts, it is the way that you treat others.

It is far more important to live well, educate yourself, and provide a good example than to simply point out others and call them stupid. We teach our kids by setting a good example, so why shouldn’t we live and talk to others in such a manner?

A home is created on values, and by gritting our teeth through the hard times. We must never forget our history, and we must always learn from the mistakes of the past. The world will be a much better place if we can learn to be happy and advance ourselves and enjoy life to the best degree possible, even if the rest of the world is falling apart. The world is built and rebuilt by those who look toward the future. It is up to each of us as individuals to make it a good one.

Socialism will never take over America

Communism was only able to fully take over Soviet Russia because the US provided the poor with food. If they had not sustained the people with bread and water, the Russian’s would have eventually rebelled and the empire would have come crashing down.

America will never be taken over by socialism. It is a mathematical impossibility. The only reason Europe has been able to sustain itself is because there have been capitalist nations in the world propping up the whole system.

At 16 Trillion Dollars in debt, we simply cannot afford to pay for any more social programs.

“The problem with socialism is that eventually you run out of other people’s money” – Margret Thatcher

We are already seeing signs that Obama’s grand plan is failing. Hundreds of businesses have announced plans to lay off workers and cut hours to stop the heavy burden and costs of ‘obamacare’.

Almost every State has now signed a petition on the white house website to secede from the Union.

People are fed up, they will not put up with the slug that is socialism. We are in a period not seen since the revolutionary and civil wars. It is literally a battle between the producers and the moochers. But guess what? The producers will not allow themselves to be shackled. Before they pay another dime for social programs and taxes, they will simply close up shop and ‘go galt’.

The engine of the world is driven by capitalism. Without it the whole world falls apart, and no amount of ‘pull’ will be able to stop it.

The battle back toward peace, liberty and prosperity has only just begun. Let not your heart be troubled. We’re in this for the long haul, and there’s a lot of work to be done.

The moochers and looters are currently celebrating their mini victory, and are currently poking fun at those of us who have been working hard to preserve our way of life. Let them have their fun, it will be short lived. Use your frustration to do good, be productive, teach others, prepare yourself and your family for what lies ahead, and be ready to reclaim the world.

Socialism has just about lived out its course in history, and when it comes to a sudden end, it will vanish from the earth, and individuals will rule once more.

America is the land of opportunity, the land of Capitalism and free enterprise. If you take those traits away, it is nothing but an empty shell, one which will fall, break and disperse, and the fragments will rebuild the way it was supposed to be. Whether we continue as a unified republic or as several states will mutual exchange of goods and services, America will flourish once more. We are currently shedding a skin, and a new one is already forming.

Go join your local Tea Party, your local liberty group, go talk to your neighbors who hold similar opinions. Build friendships, make alliances, stock up on food in case of a power black out. Learn new skills, teach yourself. Build yourself as an individual, so that no one can ever pull the rug out from under you, and so that you can always depend upon yourself, no matter what idiot is in charge of the government. They don’t control us, we employ them. Continue to throw out the incumbents, and continue to install new principled representatives who abide by the constitution.

Socialism is almost dead, the socialists just don’t realize it yet. But you and I know better, and we’ll be prepared when it happens.

America’s greatest days are still ahead.

Get an education

In order to find the truth, you must be able to read all the signs as you navigate through the minefields of information on the information highway that is the internet. Never in history has so much information been available to so many people and so easily and cheaply. Also, never has so much misinformation been so widespread, to get people off the scent of corruption.

“Great minds discuss ideas; average minds discuss events; small minds discuss people.” – Eleanor Roosevelt
There are so many distractions in the world today, that it is easy to forget what you were originally perusing, and even easier to be misguided into thinking completely differently to what you had originally set out to do.
And when speaking about education; I’m not talking about going to college. In fact, college is a big distraction. Over inflation of prices, and corruption, have made a good solid education hard to come by, and the cost to do so, will have you drowning in debt for life.
No, a true education is one that you seek for yourself from your heart. What is it that you truly wish to learn about? Do you want to learn history? What for? Do you want to learn math? Again; what for?
In order for your life to feel complete, if you feel as I do, you need to continually learn new subjects, and discover more about the world around you. It adds to life and the spice of it, when you can speak a few sentences in French, or name a fancy wine, or even talk about the affects of the British Empire on the modern world.
Can you read maps? Can you spot the difference between a genuine statement and a lie? The more you read about the world around you, and the further you go to discover the real truth, the more educated you will become.
It is not merely enough to ‘get a degree’ or follow the current flow of your country. The definition of intelligence is the ability to decipher information and understand the whole meaning of problems presented to you. A real education is to gain an understanding of the world around you, and how to make the most out of it.
There is a common theme among the people who didn’t go to college, many are inventors and innovators, and many simply have a unique understanding of business. One of my favorite books is ‘think and grow rich’ Because the mindset of believing in yourself and pushing yourself forward, is what propels these people to be successful.
Another great book is Rich Dad Poor Dad, which is a book about a boy who learns that even though his dad is a teacher, and very intelligent, he is also poor. And even though his friend’s dad is not very well educated, he is fast becoming wealthy.
Rich dad poor dad is a book that I read when I was 14 years old, and I can define it as the single most important book I’ve ever read, as far as putting me on a different path to everyone else. No I’m not a multimillionaire, and I’m not going to spew out a bunch of get rich quick programs for you to join, although I’ve come across my fair share of them. No, this book really gets you thinking about living life differently, and about how education effects your future.
Start looking at the world around you, and start thinking outside the box, and that is where your real education will begin.

We cannot escape history

“Fellow citizens, we cannot escape history” – Abraham Lincoln

If we are to seek the truth, one of the signposts to guide us must be history. If we do not follow the teachings of history  “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it” – George Santayana

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History

We must study the advantages and disadvantages of different cultures, their political systems, technological advancements, and the thought pattern of their citizenry.

One thing we must watch out for however is the source that we learn history from. Is this source objective? Is it fair and balanced? Or does the source currently work for a political agenda? After all, history is written by the victors. Imagine what history would look like if Nazi Germany had won World War II.

History is our guide, and we can learn about many aspects of modern society by comparing it to modern history all the way down to ancient history. Often there is a pattern of growth and then disintegration within a society. Corruption and manipulation of a political system, is often the root cause of this. It is allowed by the laziness of society, and the apathy of allowing a ‘ruling elite’ to run the country into the ground. In Ancient Rome, the population was kept under ignorance by what was called ‘panem et circenses’ or ‘bread and circuses’.

Bread and Circuses” (or bread and games) (from Latin: panem et circenses) is a metaphor for a superficial means of appeasement. It was the basic Roman formula for the well-being of the population, and hence a political strategy unto itself[citation needed]. In the case of politics, the phrase is used to describe the creation of public approval, not through exemplary or excellent public service or public policy, but through diversion, distraction, and/or the mere satisfaction of the immediate, shallow requirements of a populace.[1][2][3] The phrase also implies the erosion or ignorance of civic duty amongst the concerns of the common man (l’homme moyen sensuel).

In modern usage, the phrase has also become an adjective to describe a populace that no longer values civic virtues and the public life. Or as famous American author Robert Heinlein said, “Once the monkeys learn they can vote themselves bananas, they’ll never climb another tree.” To many across the political spectrum, left and right, it connotes a supposed triviality and frivolity that characterized the Roman Republic prior to its decline into the autocratic monarchy characteristic of the later Roman Empire’s transformation about 44 BCE.

It’s ironic how societies from two thousand years ago, can so directly mirror today’s society. Just take a minute to look at how mass media outlets concentrate in on once focus point, and almost completely block out anyone who has something else to say against it. John Stewart does a good job making fun of the media for blocking out presidential candidate Ron Paul during the Iowa straw poll last year.

We can learn many things through history, it is our signpost, if we learn to read the paper trails that have been left for us, we can discover the current issues more clearly, without the mass media confusing our judgment.

Remember that ‘what we do in life echos in eternity’, and that no matter which direction current history may be leading us, that we can always change the direction of it, no matter how dark the sky may become.